IN STORE VACCINATIONS

FLU VACCINATIONS

Protect yourself from a range of illness by getting your vaccination at Paddington Central Pharmacy.  

A specially trained Pharmacist will administer your vaccination. No prescription is required and appointments take only a few minutes.  All that is required is that you complete a consent form (In store), and go through the pre-vaccination checklist with the Pharmacist in Charge in which you will be asked about your existing health conditions and any previous adverse reactions you may have had. Please call beforehand to make sure we have sufficient staff required to undertake your vaccination.

Please be aware you will need to remain in store for a further 15 minutes observation period.

 

Our pharmacy provides the following vaccination services:

  • Influenza (flu) vaccination

  • Covid-19 Vaccinations Book Now

  • Whooping Cough (Diptheria - Tetanus -  Pertussis vaccination)

  • Measles Mumps & Rubella vaccination

  • Cholera vaccination

  • Hepatitis A vaccination

  • HIB (Haemophilus influenzae type B) vaccination

  • Meningococcal ACWY vaccination

  • Polio vaccination

  • Pneumococcal vaccination

What is influenza?

Influenza (flu) is a potentially life threatening illness. It is a contagious disease of the respiratory tract caused by influenza viruses. Each year, influenza causes serious infection and death around the globe, usually in the winter months (seasonal influenza).

 

Influenza can lead to complications and for some people - the elderly, people with poor immune systems and people with pre-existing respiratory, cardiac and endocrine disease - influenza can be a significant disease and cause death. It can also cause the death of healthy adults and children.

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 10 or over. Some people may not be eligible for the flu vaccine, or will be referred to their doctor. This service involves a fee.

COVID VACCINATIONS

Paddington Central Pharmacy is able to administer Covid 19 Vaccines.
AstraZeneca 18 years +

Moderna 12 to 59 Years
This service is free and does NOT involve a fee . 

WHOOPING COUGH VACCINATION

What is Whooping Cough?

Whooping Cough (pertussis) is an extremely contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. The disease causes uncontrolled coughing and vomiting, which can last for several months and can be particularly dangerous for babies under the age of 12 months.

 

Babies are at greatest risk of contracting whooping cough until they have had at least two doses of the vaccine (aged four months), as their mother’s antibodies do not provide reliable protection. About one in 200 infants under the age of six months who contract whooping cough will die from pneumonia or brain damage.

 

Increasing vaccination coverage has dramatically reduced the incidence of whooping cough among Australian children. However, it remains a highly infectious and dangerous disease. In a household where someone has whooping cough, an estimated 80-90% of the unimmunized contacts of that person will acquire the disease.

 

Whooping cough is spread through respiratory droplets, which can be transmitted in the air through coughing or sneezing, or from close contact with an infected person. It takes between seven and 20 days after infection for the symptoms of whooping cough to appear. The disease begins like a cold, before the characteristic “whooping” cough develops. This cough may persist for several months, and lead to sleep disturbance and significant weight loss. Severe complications, which occur almost exclusively in unvaccinated people, include pneumonia (lung infection) and hypoxic encephalopathy (lack of oxygen to the brain).

The best protection for babies is for their family members and close associates to have had the vaccination. Parents, grand-parents, expectant parents, other family members, childcare and healthcare workers and anyone who will be in contact with babies should be vaccinated.

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 16 or over. Some people may not be eligible for the Whooping cough vaccine, and will be referred to their doctor. This service involves a fee.

POLIO

What is Polio?

Poliomyelitis (polio)is a serious infectious disease caused by a virus. Symptoms vary from mild, flu-like symptoms to life-threatening paralysis. Between two and five per cent of people who develop paralytic polio will die. Half of those who survive will have permanent paralysis.  Symptoms of new weakness, joint and muscle pain and fatigue can occur years after an initial bout of polio and are known as post-polio syndrome. Polio can be prevented with immunisation. All children and adults should receive the vaccine. If you are not immunised, you could contract polio if your food, water or hands are contaminated with the faeces (poo) of an infected person. Serious side effects or allergic reactions to the vaccine are rare. If you are concerned about your reaction or your child’s reaction to any vaccine, see your doctor immediately.

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 16 or over. Some people may not be eligible for the Polio vaccine, and will be referred to their doctor. This service involves a fee.

MEASLES, MUMPS & RUBELLA VACCINATION

What is Measles?

Measles is a highly infectious disease caused by the Morbillivirus. The virus is spread from person to person through droplets in the air. Symptoms take between 10 and 14 days to show after infection and include rash, fever, cough, runny nose and inflammation of the eye. Complications of measles include ear, brain and lung infections, which can lead to brain damage and death. Approximately one child in every 1,000 who contracts measles will develop inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Immunisation rates of up to 95% are required for the sustained control of vaccine preventable diseases, such as measles.

 

QLD Health Information Sheet - Measles

What is Rubella (German Measles)?

Rubella is a viral infection and is sometimes called German measles, although it is not related to measles itself. Most people with rubella experience a mild illness involving fever and rash. It is important as rubella illness during pregnancy may significantly affect the developing foetus. Up to 20% of pregnant women with rubella infection will miscarry. If miscarriage does not occur, there is a risk of the infant being born with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Abnormalities from CRS occur in up to 90% of infants born to women who are infected with rubella during the first trimester of pregnancy, but defects are rare in women infected after the 20th week of pregnancy. The most common defects in CRS include deafness, cataracts and other vision problems, inflammation of the brain, heart defects, liver disease, bone disease and growth retardation.

QLD Health Information Sheet  - Rubella (German Measles)

What is the Mumps ?

One third of people with mumps have no symptoms. When present, symptoms can include swelling of one or more of the salivary glands, high fever, loss of appetite, tiredness and headache. Salivary gland swelling, if present, progresses to a maximum size over a period of two to three days. The salivary glands return to normal size within a week. In males, tenderness of the testicles may occur, while females may have some lower abdominal pain. Occasionally serious complications can occur, including inflammation of the brain, spinal cord and pancreas, hearing loss and sterility.

QLD Health Information Sheet  - Mumps

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 16 or over. Some people may not be eligible for the Measles, Mumps & Rubella vaccine, and will be referred to their doctor. The vaccine is not suitable for women who are pregnant or planning to fall pregnant soon - please speak to your GP for more advice.

This service involves a fee.

CHOLERA

What is Cholera?

Cholera is an acute diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. There are more than 200 V. cholerae serogroups; however, only the toxigenic stains of serogroups O1 and O139 are predominantly associated with cholera and cholera epidemics. Occasionally, other serogroups of V. cholerae are associated with sporadic cases but are not spread in the epidemic form.

Cholera infection is most often asymptomatic or results in mild gastroenteritis. Approximately one in 20 people will have severe disease, with profuse painless, watery diarrhoea described as ‘rice water stools’ and vomiting leading to rapid volume depletion. Rapid loss of fluid can lead to dehydration; signs and symptoms include loss of skin turgor, dry mucous membranes, hypotension and thirst. Additional symptoms include muscle cramps, which are secondary to electrolyte imbalance. Without treatment, shock can rapidly lead to death. The case-fatality rate may exceed 50 per cent without treatment but is less than 1 per cent with appropriate rehydration treatment.

This medication is an ORAL vaccine. 

The vaccine is not suitable for women who are pregnant or planning to fall pregnant soon - please speak to your GP for more advice.

This service involves a fee.

HEPATITIS A

What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a contagious disease, spread by contact with infected people, their fluids and waste. It affects the liver, with symptoms including abdominal pain and dark urine. Hepatitis A can affect people of all ages, but can be prevented with vaccination. Treatment focuses on managing symptoms.

Hepatitis A is caused by the hepatitis A virus. It is spread through contact with people infected with the disease, their fluids or waste. It affects your liver and usually causes mild illness, but can sometimes be severe and result in liver failure. Adults are more likely to have severe symptoms than children. Hepatitis A, B and C are all different diseases, so they have different symptoms and different treatments. The hepatitis A vaccine does not protect you from hepatitis B or hepatitis C

Some people who have hepatitis A have few or no symptoms, especially children under the age of 5. In adolescents and adults, hepatitis A symptoms include: fever nausea pain in the stomach area dark urine jaundice (yellow skin and eyes). Symptoms usually start about 2 to 4 weeks after catching hepatitis A. Symptoms can last for several weeks. Most people with hepatitis A fully recover. 

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 16 or over.

This service involves a fee.

Hib (HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B)

What is Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b)?

Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) is a contagious disease, caught by contact with fluids from an infected person. Symptoms include fever and a severe headache. Hib can affect people of all ages, but can be prevented with vaccination. Treatment includes antibiotics, usually in hospital.

Hib symptoms depend on which part of the body is affected and include: fever severe headache a stiff neck fits or seizures severe drowsiness difficulty waking up loss of consciousness shortness of breath, cough and breathing problems restlessness drooling joint pain, swelling and reduced movement of joints red, tender skin. Symptoms usually start about 2 to 4 days after being infected with Hib. Symptoms can get worse very quickly and you may need urgent medical attention.

How it spreads:

Hib spreads: when an infected person coughs or sneezes, and you breathe it in if you touch things that an infected person has coughed or sneezed on. Hib can live in the throats of healthy people without causing any symptoms. If you have a Hib infection, you can help stop the disease spreading by: staying away from childcare, school, work or other places where you could spread the infection – your doctor will tell you when you are no longer infectious washing your hands often covering your coughs and sneezes.

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 16 or over.

This service involves a fee.

MENINGOCOCCAL ACWY 

What is Meningococcal?

Why get immunised against meningococcal disease? Meningococcal disease is a very serious infection that can cause severe scarring, loss of limbs, brain damage and death. Vaccination is a safe and effective way to protect yourself from meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is most commonly caused by types A, B, C, W and Y. Vaccines can protect against all these types, but different vaccines protect against different types. No single vaccine protects against all types. Our pharmacy can vaccinate against the ACWY strains. 

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 10 or over.

This service involves a fee.

PNEUMOCOCCAL DISEASE

What is Pneumococcal Disease

Pneumococcal disease is a leading cause of serious illness and death among Australian children under two years of age and persons over 85 years of age. The rates are highest among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, especially in central Australia. Pneumococcal disease is also an important cause of pneumonia in adults 65 years of age or over. Older people are especially at risk of death from this disease. It is estimated to kill around one million people worldwide every year. While pneumococcal disease can occur at any time, infections seem to be more common during winter and spring. Young children, older people and people with impaired immune systems are among the most susceptible.

Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause a range of illnesses, depending on which part of the body is infected. These include: sinusitis – infection of the sinuses (air-filled cavities in the face). Symptoms include aching face, blocked nose, yellow-green nasal mucus and headache otitis media – middle ear infection. Symptoms include painful ear, hearing loss, high temperature, nausea and vomiting bacteraemia – bacteria invade the blood. Symptoms include fever, headache and muscular aches and pains. This is a very serious condition septic arthritis – joint infection. Symptoms include joint pain, swelling and reduced mobility of the joint osteomyelitis – bone infection. Symptoms include bone pain, reduced mobility of the affected part and fever pneumonia – lung inflammation. Symptoms include fever, cough, chest pains and breathing problems, such as shortness of breath meningitis – inflammation of the membranes (meninges) that enclose the brain and spinal cord. Symptoms may include high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea and vomiting, and sometimes coma. Pneumococcal meningitis is extremely serious and has a high death rate.

*Some patients may be eligible for a free vaccine from your General Practitioner - please speak to your pharmacist or GP to see if you are eligible. Pharmacist Vaccinations available for patients ages 16 or over.

This service involves a fee.